Client

Church of the Saviour, United Methodist

Background

The two-story Church of the Saviour was built in 1928 and designed by architect John Corbusier. The bell tower was built in the 1950s. The exterior walls of the original church consist of granite facing stone in a random ashlar pattern. The base of the walls, exterior trim, and coping caps consist of honed limestone. The windows in the sanctuary consist of stained glass set in Gothic stone bay arches along the north, west, and south facades. The roofing of the sanctuary consists of slate shingles installed over felt underlayment on wood decking. The roof is framed with trusses and purlins. The trusses are presumed to be steel arched trusses which are encased in wood trim.

Solution

Through water infiltration testing of the masonry walls and internal box gutter, it was determined that the condition of the masonry mass wall mortar joints and the lack of water-tight terminations of the existing gutter liner largely contributed to water leakage into the sanctuary and damage to the interior plaster. As such, WJE recommended that the granite and limestone masonry walls be repointed and the internal box gutter replaced.

WJE performed a petrographic analysis of the original mortar to repoint with a similar, more compatible mortar than what had been installed in a previous repointing. WJE designed a new box gutter system that utilizes lead-coated copper, which more closely reflects the original design of the box gutter.

WJE's repair design and construction phase services included repointing of the stone facade, replacing perimeter seals around the windows, built-in gutter replacement, and slate roofing repairs at the sanctuary and bell tower.

The Church received the Restoration of a Sacred Landmark Award from the Cleveland Restoration Society and AIA Cleveland in May 2015.